Grammar

Differences between まって and まってて / brb in Japanese

Misa6525 views

One of my students asked me the difference between まって “matte” and まって “mattete.
And I’ve read many threads where people discuss this…
but I haven’t seen people giving a proper answer yet. So I’m going to explain it here.

As you may know, 待って “matte” is the TE form of the verb 待つ “matsu”, which means “to wait”.
So 待って means “Wait (please)”.

When you start learning Te form, they teach that ~て/で is used as a request. (Please do ~).
And you learn that 待って means “Wait”. However, when you watch anime / drama
or talk to Japanese people, you will hear them saying “待って matte TE“.
What is the last て te for?! Did they just stutttttter just like thi-thi-this?!

No, they did not. 待ってて has actually a slightly different meaning to just 待って.

待ってて is actually the shortened form of ” 待っていて matte-i-te”, which is the TE form of ” 待っている matteiru”.

Let’s start comparing 待つ “matu” and 待っている “matte-iru” first.

まつ ~ will wait / wait (generally)

まっている / まってる (coll.)
~ be waiting now / have been waiting (for a while / period ) / will be waiting

Therefore

待って
is basically just “Wait!!”
as in when you want somebody to stop their action.

It’s kind of like “Wait for the right time, don’t do it yet.

「準備まだ? 早くしてよ!」

Junbi mada? Hayaku shite yo!

” Are you not ready yet? C’mon, hurry up!

「ちょっと待って!」

Chotto matte!

Give us a sec!”  = Don’t rush me. (not as rude as saying this though.)

Adding ちょっと chotto in front of 待って matte makes it sound softer.

「じゃあ、このボタンを押すよ?」

Jaa, kono botan wo osu yo?

“Then, I will push this button, okay…?”

「えっと、いや、待って!」

“Etto, iya, matte!”

“Ahhhh…no, wait!” = Don’t do it yet!

「入ってもいい?」

Haitte mo ii?
“Can I come in?”

「ちょっと待って!」

Chotto matte!

Wait a sec!” = Don’t come in yet!

 

 

While

まって
is more like “Wait here (for a bit / a while) and
I / someone will come back /get back to you (shortly).” .
It’s kind of like “Stay there (and don’t leave it/ me)”.
But if someone says “まってて”,
most of the time it implies that
that person will leave but come back eventually.
 so basically be right back / brb”. ;)

 

「忘れ物したから、ここでちょっと待って!」

Wasuremono shita kara, koko de chotto matte te!

“I left something / I forgot to take something , so stay here and I’ll be back!”

「お母さんが、もう少しで迎えに来るから、ちょっと待ってね。」

Okaasan ga, mou sukoshi de mukae ni kuru kara, chotto matte te ne.

“Your mum will come pick you up in a bit, so stay here / wait a bit.”

待ってって言ったのに、なんで先に行っちゃったの?!」

Mattete tte itta noni, nande saki ni icchatta no?!

“I told you to stay here / wait for me, why did you leave without me?!”

—Side Note φ(..)メモメモ—

Another “tte って” after “matte まって” – Why?

-> If you say ~って言う(~tte iu)  instead of ~と言う (~to iu), that’s more colloquial.

Like in English you can say “I go~” instead of “I say~”.

—–

「準備まだ? 早くしてよ!」

Junbi mada? Hayaku shite yo!
” Are you not ready yet? C’mmon, hurry up!

「ちょっと待って!」

Chotto matte te!

“Stay there, I’ll be right there / back.” = brb.

「入ってもいい?」

Haitte mo ii?
“Can I come in?”

「ちょっと待って!」

Chotto matte te!

“Stay there!”

 

 

待って and 待ってて might be confusing, but

て / てて with other verbs  is less confusing.

When you use てて, it means 

I’ll be back so meantime do ~” or

 “I’ll join you later, so start doing it without me.”

So it’s often used with 先に saki ni
which means “beforehand, without me/you/someone“.

Say “After you” in Japanese – “お先にどうぞ o saki ni douzo“,
and you are a gentleman/woman  :)

 

見る to look / watch / see

見て!あの雲、ハートの形してる!」

Mite! Ano kumo, haato no katachi shiteru!

Look! That cloud is shaped like heart!

「すぐ戻るから、テレビでも見て。」

Sugu modoru kara, terebi demo mitete.

I’ll be right back, so watch TV or something.

 

食べる to eat

「クッキー焼いたの!食べて!」

Kukkii yaita no! Tabete!

I baked biscuits! Eat it! (Have some!)

「帰りは遅いから、先に食べて。」

Kaeri wa osoi kara, saki ni tabetete.

I’ll be home late, so (start) eat(ing) without me.

 

As you can feel from these examples,
whenever you say “てて“,
the action lasts for a while

While just “” is more like,
“Do it (now or later)” as one action
that would be counted as “done“,once you do it.

Also “て form + (も) いい  / te form + (mo) ii” means

” I / you can ~ “(as a permission, not an ability).

You would usually hear “~てもいい?” like

すわって(も)いい?」 Suwatte (mo) ii?”

– “Can I sit down? “.

But sometimes they say

「 すわって(も)いい?」 Suwatte-te (mo) ii?  as well.

It means

 

 “Can I have a seat until you come back / you are done?”.

Or if it’s not a question, but you say it to someone as a permission :

すわって(も)いいよ」 suwatte (mo) iiyo.

“You can sit down.”  Becomes ->

すわって(も)いいよ」 suwatte-te (mo) iiyo.

“You can have a seat until I come back / something is done“.

More examples:

この本を読んでいい? Kono hon wo yonde ii?

Can I read this book?

(お母さんが戻ってくるまで)この本を読んでいい?

( Okaasan ga modotte kuru made) kono hon wo yonde-te ii?

Can I read this book (until my mum (you – when talking to mum) comes back)?

暇だから、ゲームしてもいい?

Hima dakara, geemu shite mo ii?

I’m bored, so can I play a video game?

ご飯の準備ができるまで、ゲームしてもいいよ。

Gohan no junbi ga dekiru made, geemu shite-te mo ii yo.

You can play a video game, until the dinner is ready.

 

Now you know why they say “てて”!

Start using this slowly, because this is what makes differences from not-very-fluent to “OH WOW fluent” ;)
Oh by the way I’ve read some people saying “TETE” just makes it sound more feminine,
but it’s not true. Guys DO use it as well. So don’t worry, and just use it :)

Hope it helps you xx 役に立ったといいな!

またね(^^)/

Misa
Translator / Linguist / Japanese Teacher / Happy World Traveler/ manga, anime, comedy lover. Speaks Japanese, English, Russian and German.

3 Comments

  1. 本当にありがとうございます!ちゃんとした説明をずっと探して、ついに見つけました☆

Comments are closed.