Grammar

MUST LEARN – Te form ① -iru/ eru verbs

Misa3638 views

TE FORM – MUST KNOW JAPANESE GRAMMAR!!!!!!! 

So what is TE form?

te

 

 

 


– Doesn’t TE て 手 mean “hands”?

– Yep, but it’s nothing to do with hands here unfortunately… 

Anyways…”TE form” plays a huge role in Japanese.

すごく大切 sugoku taisetsu!!!! – SUPER IMPORTANT!!

The very common usage is

  1. As request
    て “mite” – Look!
    *not imperative*Put ください, which means “please give me”
    after TE form, and it’s formal.
    ください ”miTE kudasai” – Please look.
  1. As a “is/are ~being (now)
    / has been ~ing (for some time)
    Te form + いるいる “mite-iru
    – is/are watching (now) / has been watchingたべいる “tabeTE-iru
    – am / is / are / have been eating (now)Te form + いた (past tense of いる)
    -> WAS doing ~ / Used to ~食べいた “tabeTE-iTA
    I was eating. / I used to eat.
  1. As a momentary verb (status)
    Te form + いる
    出来いる “dekiTE-iru”
    – It’s (been) done. (status)結婚しいる “kekkon shiTE-iru”
    – to be married (status)ドアが開いいる “doa ga aiTE-iru”
    The door is open. (status)
  1. As a sequence (do that first, then do this…)
    テレビを見、寝る。 “terebi wo miTE, neru.”
    I (will) watch TV, and then sleep.
    *You cannot use と in-between verbs, because と only connects NOUNS.
    E.g いぬとねこ inu TO neko – Dogs and cats
  1. As a past tense
    Change TE into TA or DE* into DA.

     “miTE” ->  見 “miTA”. – I watched.*見ます miMASU -> 見ました miMASHITA
    is the formal past tense.

*Why DE? You will see what verbs will take DE in this post. *

 

And more…!

But first, let’s learn :

How to make TE form
 For -iru/eru ending verbs
, such as :

  • いる 
    IRU to exist / there is someone
  • 見る みる 
    mIRU – to watch/ look / see
  • 食べる たべる 
    tabERU – to eat
  • 起きる おきる
    okIRU – to wake up
  • 寝る ねる 
    nERU – to sleep
  • 忘れる わすれる 
    wasurERU – to forget

 

Just get rid of “る” and change to ““.

☆ い “iru”->

“iTE”  Be / stay (somewhere) <as a request>

いて -> い  “was (somewhere)”  <past tense>

Someone / living thing がいる (GA iru)
There is ~. 

*Use ある aru for non-living things.

E.g 誰かがい dare-ka ga ita. – There was someone.

 

☆ 見る み “m-iru” ->

 “m-iTE”  Look!

 miTE -> み miTA – looked

いる miteIRU watching (now)

-> み miteITA was watching

E.g 昔よくアニメを見ていた mukashi yoku anime wo mite-ita.

– I used to watch anime often a long time ago.

 

☆食べる たべ “tab-eru” ->

食べ tabeTE – Eat!

たべて tabeTE -> たべ tabeTA – ate

たべいる eating 

-> たべた was eating

E.g
まだ食べいる。
Mada tabete-iru
– I’m still eating.

 

☆起き おきる ->

おき wake up!

おき – woke up

おきいる to be awake

-> おき was awake

E.g
まだ起きいるの? Mada okite-iru no?
– Are you still up (awake)?

 

☆寝る ね ->

 Sleep!

 – slept

いる sleeping

 was sleeping

E.g
ごめん、その時はもう寝いた。
Gomen, sono toki wa mou nete-ita.
– Sorry, I was already asleep at that time.

 

☆忘れる わすれ ->

わすれ Forget!

わすれ – forgot

わすれている ??
Usually we say “おぼえいない oboete-inai”
– I don’t remember

E.g
電気を消すのを忘れ
Denki wo kesu no wo wasureta.
I forgot to turn off the light.

 

☆覚え おぼえる oboERU – to memorize

おぼえ Memorize!

おぼえ – memorized

おぼえいる – I remember (state)
<-> おぼえいない I don’t remember

-> おぼえいた I remembered until ~, but now I forgot.

E.g 「Hello」という言葉を覚え
“harroo” toiu kotoba wo oboeta.
I memorized the word “Hello”.

*Put という (=called / named / “~”) only when you say the specific name / word.

Usually just <noun>をおぼえる = to memorize <noun>
*Be careful, おぼえて and おぼえた mean “memorize(d)”, not “remembered = recalled”.
If you want to say that you recalled something, (like you forgot but then recalled),
Use the verb 思い出す omoidasu = to recall.
思う omou means “to think” and 出す dasu means “to take ~ out”.

おもいだした! Omoida-shita! = I recalled!

おもいだせない omoida-senai = I cannot recall.

E.g あの人の顔を思い出せない。
Ano hito no kao wo omoidasenai.
– I cannot remember (recall) the face of the person / how s/he looks like.

 

☆かけ kakERU – to call

電話をかける denwa wo kakeru “to call”

Someone でんわをかける – to call (to) someone

でんわをかけ – Call me

でんわをかけた – called

でんわをかけいる – calling

でんわをかけいた – was calling

E.g
今はちょっと忙しいから、後でまた電話をかけ
Ima wa chotto isogashii kara, atode mata denwa wo kakete,
– I’m a bit busy at the moment, so call me again later.

 

♪Practice 練習 れんしゅう renshuu

  1. ____________________ – I was in Japan two weeks ago.
  2. _____! ____________________. – Look! There is a cat over there.
  3. _____________________. – I am watching TV.
  4. _____________________. – I was watching a movie last night.
  5. おとうさんが___________とき、ニュースを_________.
    – I was watching the news, when my dad called me.
  6. きゅうりがすきじゃないから、わたしのきゅうりも_________.
    – I don’t like cucumbers, so eat my cucumber, too?
  1. ___________________、おなかがいっぱい。- I ate a lot, so I’m full.
  2. もう8じ(hachi-ji)だよ!__________. – It’s 8 o’clock already! Wake up!
  3. ____________________________________. I woke up at 9 today.
  4. ___________________________. – I slept a lot.
  5. ____________________________. –  The children are already asleep.
  6. __________を_____________. – I forgot the new word. * word = たんご
  7. _________________________. – I memorized new words.
  8. あのひとの___________________________.
    – I don’t remember that person’s (his/her) name.
  9. ________、____________に________________.
    – Yesterday (,) I called my friend.

 

 

*I’ve written ている and ていた form the way it is supposed to be this time,
But in real life, we say てる and てた without い in informal speech.
Trust me, it’s not wrong and that makes you sound more natural.
For formal speech, you can still omit い like ています and てました,
If it’s not too formal.
But for things like business meetings, only stick to”てます and てました”.

 

NEXT -> How to conjugate other verbs into “TE-form”.

Misa
Translator / Linguist / Japanese Teacher / Happy World Traveler/ manga, anime, comedy lover. Speaks Japanese, English, Russian and German.

4 Comments

  1. When you said you can omit the い in formal speech and gave the following example “ています”, isn’t the い still there

    1. ます is used for formal speech so usually い is not omitted like ています. (Though there are different levels of formality so you could say てます in formal speech but slightly casual. Like talking to a neighbour doesn’t need to be so formal but not casual, then てます would be good. But not really acceptable in written language.)

  2. Because of that picture :D, I am distracted and did not understand anything at all on this topic :D. I wish I had a teacher like her :).

  3. Misa,
    I just stumbled across your blog a few days ago and it has been so helpful! I am from the U.S. and am living in Japan as a missionary and an international school middle-high school teacher. I have been trying to learn Japanese by myself and recently with the help of a Japanese tutor, and your website has been so helpful. Thank you so much and please keep it up!

    Sincerely,
    Laura

Comments are closed.